6 Things Your Tongue Can Tell You About Your Health

It is common to find people neglecting the existence of their tongue and how critical it is to take of it. With time, the tongue usually seems to be a random part of the body, even though we use it every day. However, you should know that your dentist can determine how your oral and general health is with a look at your tongue. In this article, you’ll also learn the things your tongue can tell about your health.

Generally, a healthy tongue must be dark pink, firm, moist, and riddled with small bumps known as papillae. When you check your tongue, and it doesn’t look like the norm, here are six things it could be mean:

1. Your Oral Microbiome Have Changed:

Remember that there is all manner of bacteria and microbes in the mouth, which means your tongue is exempted. Even though this might sound awful to you, you need to get used to it to always pat attention to the microbiome in your mouth – it determines your oral hygiene.

If you’re concerned about how the microbiome in your mouth and your general oral health is doing, you need to pay close attention to your tongue in the mirror. While your mouth and tongue cannot be rid of the microbiome, your tongue needs to have a normal appearance to know there’s a balance.

Nevertheless, if your tongue has a visible white coating on it, it shows that you have to spend more energy and time on your oral microbiome. This simply means paying more attention and taking care of your oral hygiene.

2. Dehydration:

One of the common symptoms is a dry mouth and tongue. Dehydration describes a situation where your body lacks enough fluid to function effectively. Your mouth and tongue get dried up because the lack of fluid means your body can’t produce saliva. To conserve fluid, the body will stop getting saliva into your mouth. It doesn’t stop there as you begin to find it difficult to breakdown food. This can also reduce your ability to keep healthy teeth.

However, healthy people can remain dehydrated only if they drink fluids. The neurons in the brain are all involved in monitoring beverage and food intake and blood levels to maintain thirst by channeling hormonal messages that comprise drinking. The taste buds help send messages to the brain about the body fluids before they are met with bloodstreams to ignite the quenched thirst.

Sometimes, taking more liquids might not solve the problem of dry mouths and tongues. Among other causes of concern for your tongue and mouth are far more uncommon conditions that instigate dry mouth. Some medical treatments, health conditions, or certain medications can also be responsible for a dry mouth and tongue.

3. Immune System Alarm:

Several body parts play either a supporting or direct role in maintaining the body’s immune health. The tongue has a tie to immune health due to its function in the digestion of food. If various usual lifestyle factors stress your immune system, your tongue will show results. Some signals are the same as those found in the oral microbiome.

Usually, your immune system doesn’t permit too many bacteria to pile up on your tongue, such as yeast gathering on your tongue. Typically, it is almost impossible not to have some of these invaders on your tongue, but your immune system should be able to fend them off. And even if they are to be in your mouth at all, there is a level your immune system should allow.

Therefore, when your tongue is completely white-coated, which could be a major signal that your oral microbiome isn’t balanced. You can either support it with immune-boosting habits or visit your dentist.

4. Excessive Stress:

It might seem hard to believe that stress could have anything to do with the tongue. Well, stress causes a lot of things that are yet to be uncovered – It is harmful to the entire body, and the tongue isn’t an exception.

While your tongue’s whiteness can easily be seen as unhealthiness, once stress begins to affect your tongue, the sign is usually deep redness. Also, if your tongue’s edges are scalped continuously, it could mean that you’re always biting your tongue as a result of stress.

In everything you engage in, know that even your taste buds are also affected by excessive strain. Studies have shown that your taste buds are heavily strained in times of stress. This isn’t common knowledge as the tongue is always taken for granted. So, you need conscious self-care to reduce daily stress for both your mind and body.

5. Nutritional Deficiencies;

Your tongue allows you to know the taste of anything you consume and also help digest them. However, if your meals are lacking in certain nutrients, your tongue can tell.

If your tongue is always deep red, it might be a signal to adjust your choice of meal. Observe your intake of two crucial vitamins (B9 and B12) and one iron. All these vital nutrients should be in a balanced diet.

Vitamin B12 is present in beef, eggs, and seafood. Folic acid (also called vitamin B9) is present, legumes (e.g: Broccoli & Spinach). But if you want to include iron in your diet, take organ meats, poultry, nuts, and beans.

6. Proper Hygiene:

Apart from taking nutritious diets, not smoking and adequate hydration are some of the best hygiene practices for a healthy tongue and mouth. This is the last on the least but is the number one basic signal your tongue could be telling you – you need proper oral hygiene.

Your tongue is meant to be a shade of pink, but if the surface of your tongue is white-coated, it means there is a yeast overgrowth in your oral cavity. Of course, the solution is to brush regularly, and while at it, touch as many areas of your tongue as your toothbrush can reach.

Another form of proper hygiene you could offer your tongue does away with tobacco and smoking.

Conclusion

Your tongue is a vital part of your body, and it says a lot about your general health, which is why you are asked to bring out your tongue during some of your medical appointments. Nonetheless, you don’t have to rely on medical practitioners to know the things your tongue can tell you about your health. With this post, your steps ahead of maintaining a healthy tongue. But if you still aren’t sure, you can see your dentist.